Thursday, June 11, 2015

8 Things Your Eyes Reveal About Your Health Read more: http://www.oprah.com/health_wellness/What-Your-Eyes-Reveal-About-Your-Health#ixzz3clQetUb6

Ophthalmologists look into your body in a way no other doctor can, giving them surprising insights into what's going on.

Read more: http://www.oprah.com/health_wellness/What-Your-Eyes-Reveal-About-Your-Health#ixzz3clQjJxli



New Clues for Detecting Colorectal Cancers Earlier

Patients saw their family doctor significantly more often in the year before their diagnosis than did people without cancer

Tuesday, June 09, 2015

How scientists built the world’s first lab-grown limbs

Harald Ott spent weeks in a lab tending to a tiny rat’s forelimb. He got a special incubator for it, monitored it daily, cared for its every need.
The reason a rat leg was worth all that work? There was no rat attached to it.
Ott, a researcher and thoracic surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital, is the proud parent of the world’s first lab-grown biolimb — a living, functioning, artificial leg that responds to stimuli and even circulates blood,  the hospital announced Tuesday. Though it’s still a long way off from made-to-order transplants for humans, Ott and other regeneration experts say that the tiny pink rat leg is a step toward the future of artificial limbs.
“This is science fiction coming to life,” Daniel Weiss, a lung regeneration specialist at the University of Vermont College of Medicine, told the New Scientist.

Wednesday, June 03, 2015

High Prices for Drugs Attacked at Meeting

Cancer specialist criticizes new-treatment costs in high-profile speech

He said that one step toward controlling prices would be allowing Medicare to negotiate prices directly with pharmaceutical companies, which it is currently barred by law from doing.

Color Vision Articles from Science Daily

When the color we see isn't the color we remember


Brain, not eye mechanisms keep color vision constant across lifespan


Bach to the blues, our emotions match music to colors

Tuesday, June 02, 2015

Smart Glove to Guide Blind People Inside Grocery Stores

Researchers at Penn State are working on a smart glove that can help blind people shop at the grocery store. The idea came because figuring out what items are on the shelves is a major limitation blind people report as wanting to be able to overcome. There are products in existence that can scan bar codes and tell you what’s inside the package, but they depend on the bar code facing the camera or laser used to scan it. The other problem is that these products don’t help you find what you’re looking for, but simply verify that what you’re holding is the right thing.
link

Thursday, April 30, 2015

Pixium Vision Implants Restore Sight in Rats with Retinal Degeneration, Humans Next (VIDEO)

Prima Vision, a company based in Paris, France, is reporting that its PRIMA wireless subretinal implants for people who lost their vision has show a great deal of promise in a pre-clinical trial. The technology is designed specifically for those whose natural photoreceptors no longer function, yet who retain retinal neurons that can be electrically activated. A bunch of the implants are injected into the back of the eye, each around 70-μm in width that represents a single pixel. The implants are basically tiny photovoltaic solar panels that emit electricity in response to light hitting their surface.
Link

Sunday, April 12, 2015

ABOUT once a month I run across a person who radiates an inner light. These people can be in any walk of life. They seem deeply good. They listen well. They make you feel funny and valued. You often catch them looking after other people and as they do so their laugh is musical and their manner is infused with gratitude. They are not thinking about what wonderful work they are doing. They are not thinking about themselves at all.
When I meet such a person it brightens my whole day. But I confess I often have a sadder thought: It occurs to me that I’ve achieved a decent level of career success, but I have not achieved that. I have not achieved that generosity of spirit, or that depth of character.
Link

Sunday, April 05, 2015

Will Your Child Become Nearsighted? One Simple Way To Find Out

This is for everyone whose parents said, "Sitting too close to the TV is going to ruin your eyes." In other words, pretty much all of us.
Sitting too close to the TV doesn't predict nearsightedness, according to a study that tracked the vision of thousands of children over 20 years. Nor does doing a lot of close work.
Instead, as early as age 6 a child's refractive error — the measurements used for an eyeglass prescription — best predicts the risk.
LINK

Thursday, March 12, 2015

How $5000 surgery can permanently change brown eyes to blue

In the classic 1930s movie, "The Wizard of Oz," Dorothy asks the good citizens of Oz whether they could dye her eyes to match her gown, and they happily oblige. Of course, eyes are not like hair, and 75 years on you still cannot dye your eyes to suit your outfit. But it turns out that you can actually change their color with the aid of a laser.
The technique was pioneered by California-based Stroma Medical and it is currently available in several countries, but it has yet to receive approval in the United States. So far,37 patients in Mexico and Costa Rica have undergone the procedure, which permanently turned their eyes from brown to blue.



Read more: http://www.iflscience.com/technology/lasers-can-turn-your-eyes-blue-brown-5000#ixzz3UCtpDO00

Monday, March 09, 2015

BRAIN’S LIGHT DETECTOR IS NOT SO SIMPLE AFTER ALL

Neuroscientists generally think of the front end of the human visual system as a simple light detection system.
The patterns produced when light falls on the retina are relayed to the visual cortex at the rear of the brain, where all of the “magic” happens. That’s when the patterns are transformed into our 3D view of the world.
Now, however, a brain imaging study challenges this basic assumption.

Friday, March 06, 2015

This Is Your Brain on Love

Why love is not an emotion and how obsessive thinking begets romantic joy.
(Another great post from Maria Popova at Brainpickings)


Today, we turn to biological anthropologist Helen Fisher, who studies the evolution of human emotions and the intricacies of the brain in — and on — love. Fisher explores the science of love without losing a sense of romance, shedding light on some of the complex ways in which the brain and the heart diverge.
If you can stomach the geekines, there’s actually a wealth of insight in this talkDr. Fisher gave at the American Psychiatric Association’s Sex, Sexuality and Serotonin conference in 2004, brilliantly synthesized here, in which she argues — with solid scientific evidence and from a rich interdisciplinary perspective — that antidepressants may jeopardize romantic love.
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